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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
of times later in the day. the governor and president obama took a helicopter ride over the area from atlantic city down to an area where the governor had told people to get off and in many cases they didn't and he kind of jokingly but firmly let them know when they were speaking a couple minutes after the video you're seeing right now, he let them know he was not happy with them but he'd give them a break this time around. but it's just a very, very kind of like -- this is a -- you know it's not a big state geographically but it's a very densely populated state and very diverse when it comes to geography as well. the highlands took a tremendous hit because that's where the winds seemed to be the strongest and trees came down and power is out there and there's no telling when it will be restored. along the shore, of course, you're seeing some of the damage that occurred there where once stood houses there are now waves in some cases. then you go up farther north closer to new york city across the hudson and you have places like jersey city and hoboken, places that are populated with a
president obama or governor romney to return to the campaign trail. they're operating with very little information. we can't know at this point just how devastating the damage might turn out to be. as a result i think both campaigns are being very cautious about what they do other than paying attention to the storm. >> woodruff: susan, what's your read on how the campaigns are dealing with all this? >> i think there are two things to look at. one is just the logistics, for instance, does this storm affect early voting that's going on now in ohio and north carolina and virginia? but a second thing is the larger atmospherics. what is the effect of having president obama go off the campaign trail back to the white house? the white house just this afternoon released a photo of him meeting in the situation room to get an update on storm damage. it seems to me that has an impact on a race where governor romney has been making some progress in recent days. does this kind of freeze things for where they are now. >> woodruff: that's what i wanted to ask you, susan. does one candidate or another
's a consequential difference. they know that president obama is going to increase taxes, where, where governor romney is not if he's elected president. that's an important issue distinction. coming into the last debate, the annenberg survey showed that the public thought that governor romney was more likely to take the country into a war, than was president obama. but the public also believed that president obama had gone around the world apologizing. now in the last debate, governor romney reassured that he was not as likely to take people into war as they had thought in that debate. and i think that was a calculated strategy on his part. now, you could say, "and it was illegitimate. you secretly know that he was more likely." but nonetheless, what we can measure is whether they get what he said he was going to do in the context. and i think that president obama responded to the apologizing around the world claim in a number of ways that were effective as well. and i think one of the things that we can say about debates making a difference is that, had there been debates in the goldwater/john
be altering the presidential campaign which is one week to election day, president obama and governor romney canceled rallies and stump speeches on monday and tuesday. yesterday, president obama spoke from the white house briefing room. >> i am not worried at this point about the impact on the election, i am worried about the impact on families and worried about the impact on our first responders, i am worried about the impact on our economy. and on transportation. you know, the election will take care of itself next week. >> and here is what governor romney said. >> on the eastern coast of our nation, a lot of people are enduring some very difficult times. >> and our hearts and our prayers go to them as we think about how tough it is going to be there. i don't think there has been a hurricane in ohio in a long time. but there have been some hurricanes that have caused a lot of damage across this country and hurt a lot of families and their families are in harm's ways that will be hurt either in their possessions or perhaps even something more severe. >> we have faced these kind of challeng
are working none stop to help life return to normal. president obama joined governor chris christie earlier in the day to survey the damage to new jersey's coast. >> for those like the people i just had the chance to meet on this block and thought new jersey, throughout the region whose lives have been upended, my second message is we are here for you, and we will not forget. we will follow up to make sure that you get all the help that you need until you've rebuilt. >> what i said yesterday i really mean. there has got to be sorrow, and you see that, and the president has seen that today, in the eyes and faces of a lot of the folks he's met, and that sorrow is appropriate. we suffered some loss. luckily we haven't suffered that much loss of life, and we thank god for that. but we have suffered losses, and this is the worst storm that i've seen if my lifetime in this state but we cannot permit that sorrow to replaces the resilience they know all new jerseyans have. >> rose: after andrew cuomo of new york early today completed touring the region. he shared his impressions while discussing th
: a short time later, governor christie greeted president obama and federal emergency management agency head craig fugate in atlantic city. the trio toured the storm damage along the coast. >> we're going to have a lot of work to do. i don't want anybody to feel that somehow this is all going to get cleaned up overnight. we want to make sure that people have realistic expectations. but what i can promise you is that the federal government will be working as closely as possible with the state and local officials and we will not quit until this is done. and the directive i have given-- and i said this yesterday but i will repeat and i think craig and others who are working with me right now know i mean it-- we are not going to tolerate red tape, we're not going to tolerate bureaucracy. >> woodruff: meanwhile, republican mitt romney returned to the campaign trail today with three events in florida. the g.o.p. presidential nominee also mentioned the ongoing recovery in the northeast. >> this is... this is quite a time for the country, as you know. we're... we're going through trauma in a major p
, and the election. president obama suspended campaigning to oversee the government's storm response. governor mitt romney canceled campaign events in the key states of virginia and new hampshire. darren gersh tonight looks at the impact with election day one week away. >> reporter: both campaigns say they have stopped fundraising and campaigning in states in sandy's path. governor romney was still looking for votes today in ohio, iowa and wisconsin, but his campaign says he will stay away from the key swing states of virginia and new hampshire to let emergency workers there focus on the storm. both candidates say this is a time for the nation to come together. >> i am not worried at this point about the impact on the election. i'm worried about the impact on families, and i'm worried about the impact on our first responders. i'm worried about the impact on our economy and on transportation. the election will take care of itself next week. >> i would like to ask you who are here today to think about making a contribution to the red cross or another relief agency, to be of help if you possibly can i
america editor in florida where president obama was supposed to be campaigning today and bridgette in cleveland, ohio, the state where governor romney was supposed to be stomping today. let's start with you in florida. i'm incredibly jealous. pouring with rain here in washington, d.c. it must feel a world away, both weather-wise and politically. >> yes, it does. we woke up here this morning thinking the president wag going to launch his campaign. we knew this was going to be a big moment with bill clinton rolling out the big guns, if you like, and that was all canceled rather suddenly just as we woke up. so it was really strange knowing he was flying back to cope with a crisis while the rally went on and the normal things you hear at these rallies, the political campaign was going on. and the storm was mentioned by bill clinton but really not heavily. only in passing. and i think people are obviously talking about it to a certain extent. it's not in the front of their minds. what it does politically, conventional campaigning has ceased. it takes the two candidates off the media. i
long it will take for the cleanup. i very pleased that the governor signed the declaration. it will be up to us to make sure that bureaucracy does not get in the way. >> ok, thank you very much for joining us. when barack obama was torn in new jersey, he was the president of the u.s., but he was also there as a candidate hoping for four more years in the job. with just six days to go, politics is inevitable part of the response. what we don't know is how it will affect the race. for more, i spoke with douglas brinkley whose experiences are chronicled in the book, the great delusion. >> well, we did have the 2005 hurricane katrina which devastated the gulf south america. we had 2000 people killed in that disaster. we have never had something like this, and actual disaster. what was learned from katrina is that george w. bush got a lot of phones down for doing a flyover and for not going into louisiana. for acting like he could look at it from a distance. all politicians have learned from his mistakes. uc barack obama cancelling his campaign, going to new jersey, and meeting
that the irony about the current healthcare debate is that much of obama's healthcare plan was modeled on the very plan implemented in massachusetts in 2006, under then governor mitt romney. >> massachusetts once again is taking a giant leap forward. >> romney says he remains proud of the massachusetts plan passed with overwhelming bipartisan support. and even today, a copy of that bill is depicted in his official portrait that hangs in the statehouse in boston. >> but the governor says each state should be allowed to devise its own healthcare plan. and of course many in the gop believe the government has no business requiring individuals to buy insurance in the first place. it's still another illustration of the fundamental split between the candidates and their parties about the role of government. the two parties aren't exactly united on foreign policy either. but they're closer. my newshour colleague, margaret warner, is in washington and has our report about that. >> thanks maria. as the campaign hurtles toward election day, much of the foreign policy debate has focused on a few,
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)